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Tips to Manage Heartburn and GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disease)

 

NutritionChat
(@nutritionchat)
Joined: 2 years ago
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A few tips to Manage Heartburn and GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disease) - thanks to Vivamus' informative post on NF.

A few tips and tricks for GERD

(1) Pursue variety and moderation in the material, below. Avoid fanaticism:

(2) “Low carbohydrate diet” is just a synonym for a high fat, high protein diet. These diets tend to exacerbate GERD – and have other negative health consequences, as well. I suggest that you focus on “low fat Whole Food Plant Based diet.”

(3) Note that fat closes off your pyloric sphincter and traps food in your stomach – with peristaltic churning – for hours. This exacerbates GERD symptoms. The fat intrinsic to meats, cheese, oils, avocados, nuts, seeds and chocolate are all sufficient to bring about this effect. A low fat diet reducing or eliminating much of the above is a good place to start to combat GERD.

(4) Ice-cold food and drinks open up the pyloric sphincter and empty the stomach, reducing GERD symptoms. Avoid carbonated beverages – the carbonation just expands the stomach and exacerbates GERD symptoms.

(5) Graze – multiple small meals and snacks instead of three large meals a day.

(6) Different people have different triggering foods. Look for yours and avoid as appropriate.

(7) Do what you can to reduce abdominal pressure. If overweight, lose weight. A BMI of 21 may be a useful target. Or a waist-hip ratio of .95 or better (.85 in females). Or a waist circumference that is ~50% of height.

(8) Avoid clothing that increases abdominal pressure – particularly when sitting down. Buy larger-waisted clothes and avoid belts; switching to loose-waisted.

(9) Elevating your head off the bed by 6 inches may be helpful (but stop if this causes ankle swelling).

(10) Avoid eating for 3+ hours before sleeping. Final meal of the day - small, cold, low fat, low spice.

(11) Switch sleeping positions. If you normally sleep on your back, try sleeping on your side, and experiment with different-sized pillows and the other side of the bed

(12) Try sublingual B12.

(13) Antacid medicines may reduce absorption of B12/iron and other nutrients - have a blood test. Your stomach is “designed” to be an acid factory – when that is curtailed medically, there are profound effects on digestion.

(14) Pay attention to your body, and adjust as appropriate.

(c) Vivamus

Not medical advice. Merely informational. For medical advice, work closely with your wise and learned locally licensed Physician.

The Best Diet for Upset Stomach

'Dyspepsia' is upset stomach — the common feelings of fullness, discomfort, nausea, bloating, belching. People become hypersensitive to the stretching of their stomach when they eat.

Try:
- Reduce the amount of food eaten (smaller, lighter meals).
- Amalaki (amla, Indian gooseberries) - 1tsp amla powder, 3 times/day
- Cut out gluten.
- Reduce high-fat meals (helps 86% of people) - fatty foods take three times longer to empty from the stomach, and increase the severity and frequency of dyspepsia. More fat = worse symptoms (nausea, discomfort).


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(@rutherford-mesk)
Joined: 11 months ago
Posts: 1
 

Various individuals have distinctive setting off food sources. Search for yours and avoid it.


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NutritionChat
(@nutritionchat)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 79
Topic starter  

The Best Diet for Upset Stomach

'Dyspepsia' is upset stomach — the common feelings of fullness, discomfort, nausea, bloating, belching. People become hypersensitive to the stretching of the stomach when you eat.

Try:
- Reduce the amount of food eaten (smaller lighter meals).
- Amalaki (amla, Indian gooseberries) - 1tsp amla powder, 3 times/day
- Cut out gluten.
- Reduce high-fat meals (helps 86% of people) - fatty foods take three times longer to empty from the stomach, and increase the severity and frequency of dyspepsia. More fat = worse symptoms (nausea, discomfort).


ReplyQuote